A Nepalese Adventure

Mummy and Tessa descending from the summit

First published in The Mother’s Milk Books Writing Prize Anthology 2014: THE STORY OF US, edited by Teika Bellamy, Sept 2015 

Your rhythmical sweet breathing calms my racing heart as I climb steadily at this high altitude. You sleep soundly, strapped firmly to my back in a sling, the safest place on earth, your sanctuary. I feel you stir as I reach Kyangjin Ri, hundreds of prayer flags fluttering in the wind, awesome snow mountains rising majestically in every direction. You are only twenty months old, ‘bis mahinar‘, as I have replied to continuous enquiries from local Nepalis and amazed tourists alike. I force a smile to encourage my husband on, as he labours in this thin air with a far greater weight than I, that of our four-and-a-half year old son, Ewan. Continue reading A Nepalese Adventure

Mothering Through Breastfeeding – the sequel

This article first appeared in Le Leche’s breastfeeding magazine ‘Breastfeeding Matters’, July/August 2015, edition 208. DSCN0679

Caroline tells us about her tandem nursing experience, and how breastfeeding has always felt like the natural choice for her and her babies.

As I write this, my son and daughter’s tandem nursing days are drawing to a close, as Ewan is gradually and naturally weaning from the breast. He is four and a half years old. His younger sister, Tessa, now twenty months, nurses day and night. Words can never do justice to what my life has been like since having children; they have been the most eventful, joyous, challenging, memorable, exhausting and reflective years of my life, filled with laughter and tears. I have learnt to juggle, both physically and emotionally, two growing nurslings. My children have taught me more than I ever imagined, about myself, about breastfeeding and about life. Below I share a little of this enfolding journey, of mothering, of breastfeeding, and how the two converge.

Pregnancy

Nursing remained a place of sanctuary, support and comfort to Ewan throughout his third year. He persisted, even when there was little milk left as my pregnancy developed, seeing this out to the day I went into labour. As Tessa grew inside me, so did the unwelcome feeling of being ‘touched out’. These strong feelings were telling me to push Ewan away. I struggled to come to terms with the first negative feelings around feeding Ewan, which left me guilt-ridden and shocked. This was compounded with the physical challenge of nursing while pregnant, as my nipples became sore and my bump grew bigger. I persisted by placing boundaries on when Ewan could feed and for how long, not feeling ready to completely wean him yet.

I vividly recall Ewan’s last feed as an only child, the day I went into labour. As we lay snuggled up in bed I silently wept, aware the next time he fed would be radically different and that our relationship would alter once the new baby came along. Ewan was oblivious to my tears as he fell asleep dreamily on the breast. A few hours later, my parents came to collect Ewan, leaving me to labour in peace with my husband, and later, my independent midwife. My hope was for a natural home-birth this time, having experienced an emergency caesarean under general anaesthetic with Ewan. Continue reading Mothering Through Breastfeeding – the sequel

The Story of Us

Below I blog about the origins of ‘A Nepalese Adventure’, which has recently been published in an anthology by Mother’s Milk Books. I also briefly review ‘The Story of Us’ Anthology.

You can purchase a copy of ‘The Story of Us’ from Mother’s Milk Books or from Amazon.

The Story of Us
The Story of Us

Origins of ‘A Nepalese Adventure’

With my students in 1998
With some of my students in 1998

A year ago, my husband, daughter (then eighteen months) and son (then 4 and a half) and I spent almost six weeks in Nepal, our biggest adventure as a family to date. At the tender age of eighteen I lived in Nepal as part of my gap year, teaching children on a Tibetan refugee camp. I also trekked in the Himalayas and explored the country. This formative experience has hugely influenced my life. Nepal and its people captured my heart back in 1998 and still do today. I vowed if I ever had children I would take them to Nepal, to show them where I had once spent a truly magical part of my teenage years and to introduce them to one of the most beautiful places on earth. Last year I was very fortunate to be able to achieve this dream; after a tremendous amount of planning and preparation we were off on the adventure of a lifetime. Continue reading The Story of Us

A Nepalese Adventure

First published in ‘The Mother’s Milk Books Writing Prize Anthology 2014 ‘The Story of Us’, Edited by Teika Bellamy.

My family and I at the top of our world
My family and I at the top of our world

Your rhythmical sweet breathing calms my racing heart as I climb steadily at this high altitude. You sleep soundly, strapped firmly to my back in a sling, the safest place on earth, your sanctuary. I feel you stir as I reach Kyangjin Ri, hundreds of prayer flags fluttering in the wind, awesome snow mountains rising majestically in every direction. You are only twenty months old, ‘bis mahinar‘, as I have replied to continuous enquiries from local Nepalis and amazed tourists alike. I force a smile to encourage my husband on, as he labours in this thin air with a far greater weight than I, that of our four-and-a-half year old son, Ewan. Continue reading A Nepalese Adventure

My children, my teachers

Welcome to the August 2015 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Life Learners

This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Code Name: Mama and Hobo Mama. This month our participants have talked about how they continue learning throughout life and inspire their children to do the same.

Travelling in Scotland

Life learning is an interesting, relevant, large and worthy topic for parents to explore. Here’s my post about how I continue to be a learner now I’m a parent with two young children.

Background

I was fortunate to be to able to spend the majority of my twenties studying, training or travelling. My son was born just shy of my thirtieth birthday, my daughter followed almost three years later. I have spent the past half decade parenting, finding some time to also pursue my hobbies of writing, yoga and walking. More recently, I started volunteering at my children’s playgroup, which has led me down a new and exciting career path in Forest School.Our family in Quebec

Forest School training

IMG_1124
On the forest school training course

I am at the beginning of a year of training to be a Forest School Practitioner, having taken an initial training course and now consolidating my skills through further voluntary work, studying in order to complete my portfolio and the start of paid employment one session per week in the role of Leader at Woodland Adventurers, an outdoor session for 2 to 3 year olds at playgroup. If all goes to plan, I will be a qualified practitioner by the end of 2016. Studying is in addition to my main role as mother and home educator of my children, who are now 5 and 2 and a half years old.

Learning and parenting

Ewan and his Mummy
Baby Ewan and mummy

After my son was born, I spent many hours devouring every natural parenting book available, mainly when Ewan was nursing. I was in the very fortunate position of being able to dedicate most of my time and energy to my son, without a job to return to or other children to already care for. Becoming a mother sparked a period of new self-directed learning, with the ultimate aim of becoming a better, more informed mother. This more choice-based, learner-led research was a far-cry from the more formal, directed learning of my past. It also bore in me a period of creativity in writing, which is still developing. Continue reading My children, my teachers

A Fond Farewell to Forest School

Ewan at Forest School for the first time
Ewan at Forest School for the first time

Finding Forest School

On a wet, uninspiring late November day back in 2012, I sat sipping tea in the Outside Café in Hathersage with my husband and two and a half year old son Ewan, when my attention was suddenly taken by an advert for a Forest School Open Day in a couple of weeks time in Grindleford. I had an uncanny feeling that this might be the answer to our preschool search, which I had embarked on months before but was beginning to despair in.

Setting up Forest School, New Year 2013
Setting up Forest School, New Year 2013

We went along to the open morning, meeting staff and children at the Pavilion and walking into the National Trust owned Hay Wood, a short walk from the Pavilion. The friendly staff informed me that their Forest School

Ewan at two and a half
Ewan at two and a half

was opening in the new year and that I could apply for Ewan. The walk inspired me; I had stumbled across an alternative way of educating preschool children which really appealed to me. Learning more about the ethos of Forest School only confirmed that this was where I wanted my son to be. On a bright day in the new year we helped the staff and other parent volunteers create the forest school site and applied for Ewan to attend from September. Living at a distance from the playgroup I was unsure whether he would get in. To my immense relief he did. Continue reading A Fond Farewell to Forest School

Wild summer days

Welcome to the July 2015 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Summer Fun

This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama. This month our participants have talked about how to get out and enjoy the warmer season as a family.

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IMG_4671aA blog post about what we get up to in the summer months could be pages long, as we are a very active family regardless of the weather, but in the warmer summer months we are out and about even more than ever. To keep it concise I have broken up our activities into mini themes to help you navigate;

The Buzzards, a tiny campsite
The Buzzards, a tiny campsite

Camping; as a family we love going camping, using our trusty 3 person tunnel tent as our home from home, with a good size porch giving space to eat if the weather is bad and space for our Labrador to sleep. The Tiny Camp-sites book has really inspired us; all the

Our tent
Our tent

camp-sites are an acre or less, many rustic with rather basic facilities, which is just what we like. We prefer the feel of almost camping in someone’s back garden, as opposed to camping on a large camp-site with all mod-cons.

Tessa and Ewan by the camp-fire
Tessa and Ewan by the camp-fire

For instance, at the end of June this year, we returned to The Buzzards camp-site in Hereforshire, where we were again the only campers. This is a friendly, small camp-site with a compost-able toilet (and another toilet attached to the owner’s home with a shower too) and place to light a fire. Continue reading Wild summer days